Author Topic: Die Rand en die Dollar en sulke dinge  (Read 4874 times)

Cassie

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Re: Die Rand en die Dollar en sulke dinge
« Reply #30 on: August 28, 2015, 10:17:52 am »
Is hulle in hulle kassies? Nog nie die seel gebreek nie? Of praat jy van die wat jy as kleingeld gekry het in n winkel? Indien dit die kleingeld munte is.....umh jammer dis nie iets werd nie. Die wat wel R1000+ werd is moet in hulle kassies wees en geseel. O0

Duuuuuuuuuuuude! Wil jy van jou stoel afval?

Dié wat in hul kassies is en nog geseël is, is BAAAAAAAAAAIE meer werd as net R1000+!

Quote from: sacoin.co.za
....the proof 70 Mandela R5 90th birthday coins will be selling for R450 000 at the end of the year and around R1 million rand at the end of 2015.
We are projecting that the proof 69 Mandela R5 birthday coins will be selling for R65 000 at the end of this year and R120 000 at the end of 2015.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2015, 10:20:13 am by Cassie »

Offline Oupa Manie

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Re: Die Rand en die Dollar en sulke dinge
« Reply #31 on: August 29, 2015, 17:13:41 pm »
Dit gaan oor alles oor daai woordjie "proof"...

Offline Oupa Manie

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Re: Die Rand en die Dollar en sulke dinge
« Reply #32 on: August 31, 2015, 09:40:34 am »
WHAT IS A PROOF?

Included in the 22 million coins minted to commemorate Nelson Mandela’s 90th birthday in 2008 were 19 000 proof coins and what the SA Mint calls “proof-like” coins. Proof coins are intended for collectors, and in the case of the Mandela R5 birthday coins, they were also distributed to dignitaries.

The process of minting a proof coin is different from that of ordinary circulation coins – it is more labour-intensive and the finish may be highly polished and/or contain areas of “frosting”. When graded, it takes the PF prefix (as opposed to “MS” for coins produced for circulation).

The SA Mint distributed 5 000 sets of proof coins and 14 000 “proof-like” coins. These coins were protected in capsules soon after they were minted. For this reason, you can expect the surface quality of such a coin to be higher than that of uncirculated coins.

101 coins have been graded a perfect PF70 and 2 215 are PF69's. PF70s sold for R275 000, and it projects that a PF 70 will be selling about R1 million at the end of 2015.

A R5 circulation coin commemorating Nelson Mandela’s 90th birthday is worth R5. It contains no precious metal and it is not rare. But cunning dealers, exploiting Mandela’s iconic brand, have talked up a market around these coins, which are on sale for anything from a couple of hundred rand to R1 million.

Offline Hillman

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Re: Die Rand en die Dollar en sulke dinge
« Reply #33 on: September 06, 2015, 18:14:51 pm »
Leer ek nou weer iets, soos hul se mens is nooit te oud om te leer nie!

Ek sien die rand dollar is nou op sy kop  :-\ en wonder wat gaan dit doen aan bv bikes en bike pryse, als word mos ingevoer.
Die manne wat uitvoer smile seker nou breed....maar ek weetnie, nie n besigheidsman of n ekonoom nie

Offline Gert J

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Re: Die Rand en die Dollar en sulke dinge
« Reply #34 on: September 07, 2015, 07:40:39 am »
Leer ek nou weer iets, soos hul se mens is nooit te oud om te leer nie!

Ek sien die rand dollar is nou op sy kop  :-\ en wonder wat gaan dit doen aan bv bikes en bike pryse, als word mos ingevoer.
Die manne wat uitvoer smile seker nou breed....maar ek weetnie, nie n besigheidsman of n ekonoom nie

Miskien moet n ou skuldmaak en koop .....
Moet nooit ophou droom nie !!

"T Rex" op Wilddogs

Offline Oupa Manie

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Re: Die Rand en die Dollar en sulke dinge
« Reply #35 on: September 07, 2015, 08:58:43 am »
Ja, dis mos nie jou skuld as jy moet skuldmaak nie... :2f

Offline Gert J

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Re: Die Rand en die Dollar en sulke dinge
« Reply #36 on: September 07, 2015, 18:50:56 pm »
Ja, dis mos nie jou skuld as jy moet skuldmaak nie... :2f

Manie , omdat ek nie commute nie en my fiets net vir plesier gebruik het ek n reel dat ek nie skuld mag maak nie .....

Maar as die rand so swak gaan bly gaan die pryse  nog meer die hoogte in skiet ..... Jy kan al klaar n mooi kar vir die prys van n GSA koop ....???
Moet nooit ophou droom nie !!

"T Rex" op Wilddogs

Offline Oupa Manie

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Re: Die Rand en die Dollar en sulke dinge
« Reply #37 on: September 08, 2015, 08:39:31 am »
Manie , omdat ek nie commute nie en my fiets net vir plesier gebruik het ek n reel dat ek nie skuld mag maak nie .....

Maar as die rand so swak gaan bly gaan die pryse  nog meer die hoogte in skiet ..... Jy kan al klaar n mooi kar vir die prys van n GSA koop ....???

Daai is my reel ook Gert.

So ek sal vir my 'n nuwe (of ander) bike koop as ek een (soos Paul  :2f) kontant kan koop...en dit gaan nie gou wees nie.... :'(

Cassie

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Re: Die Rand en die Dollar en sulke dinge
« Reply #38 on: May 09, 2016, 15:23:16 pm »
Making a mint out of Mandela

Get-rich ‘rare coin’ schemes are not only rife, they are also dangerous, writes Georgina Crouth.

Quote
Mandela R5 coins are not rare and not particularly valuable. Millions of them were churned out by the South African Mint. So why would anyone then buy it as a “collector’s item” or even an investment?

In an interview with Classic FM last month, Mark Andersen, the CEO of the South African Coin Corporation, described the coin market thus: “There are two types of coins on the market: bullion and rare coins: a bullion coin is valued at its metal content that will sell by its weight – an ounce of platinum, gold or silver. It can only sell at its metal price. In terms of collecting, they are not rare.

“A rare coin has to be a currency coin: a coin that you can buy something with. A collector and investor is looking for the highest specimens of any coin… (Freshly minted coins are) sent off to one of three of the largest grading companies in the world… They grade the coin on a 10-point scale from mint state 60 to mint state 70 (the highest). If you have an MS70, and if it remained at a population of one, that would be a rare coin. The rest would come in (at lower grades)…

“With the Mandela coins – they minted many, but only a few are highly graded. Those are rare and sought-after. There are only six R5 Mandela coins that you can collect, they were minted in 1994, in proof and uncirculated; 2000 and same in 2008. If you put those aside, over time they will increase in value.

“If you call the NGC (Numismatic Guaranty Corporation of America) and asked if the Mandela coins were valuable, they would say they are – in high grades. Our goal is to market these internationally.”

I did just that, and Liza Berzins Goolsby, of the NGC’s Customer Service department, informed me: “The NGC only grades coins. We do not buy, sell, trade or value them.”

Despite abundant complaints about off-loading these coins, Andersen blames the market.

“Rare coins do unfortunately follow the market. If you’ve got a domestic economy that’s so challenged, there’s very little that will stand up to current conditions. Rare coins (have dropped in value over the past six months) – across the board.

“The great thing about coins is there’s no tax. So if you make a million rand profit on coins, there is no tax. On Kruger rands, you will make a profit, there is tax on a sale, but they’re a great investment – never a bad idea to ferret away some of those. Six months ago they were selling at R15 000 a unit; they’re now R20 000 a coin.

“Rare coins traditionally perform better than gold – it’s known as the hobby of kings – but you don’t have the kind of liquidity and you won’t be able to sell it as quickly as a Kruger rand.”

But, he conceded, some Mandela R5s weren’t such sound investments: “The MS66 – there are over 140 000 of those graded out of the 225 000 Mandelas and they are part of the rare coin market – but they are common.”

Yet his website, which is seemingly devoted to the Mandela R5s, talks up the market, bragging: “The rare R5 Mandela coins are the easiest rare coins to sell in the world.

“More and more companies and individuals are finding how easy it is to market the rare Mandela coins and so that factor alone is a constant that expands the market at a more rapid rate than any other coin market in the world.

“Rare coins just get more and more rare with the passage of time and their values just get larger and larger. The rare Mandela coins will therefore continue to expand and get larger and larger until the end of time.”

And then comes the disclaimer: “While every precaution is taken to ensure the accuracy and the soundness of the material that is contained within this website, no liability whatsoever and howsoever arising shall vest in The South African Coin Corporation (Pty) Ltd as a result of any error and/or inaccuracy and/or information and/or recommendations given from any matter contained on this site.”

Scarcity might have been a selling point at some stage, but now the market is flooded with the coins – and gullible buyers are realising that their stash of R5 Mandela coins are worth simply R5 apiece.

There have been numerous reports about the Mandela coins over the years – I could not find any complimentary – but this past week alone, two SA Coin customers, Cyprian Richards, of Gallo Manor, and Karl Botha, of Port Elizabeth, contacted me about burning their fingers badly with these coins. They warned it’s a scam and people must stay well away from them. Both were verbally assured the coins would appreciate in value, provided they kept them for at least five years, but then they came to the conclusion there was simply no market. It had bottomed out.

Peter Wilson, an independent collector who heads up the National Association of Numismatic Societies, also agreed that the market is flooded.

“The biggest problem in numismatics at the moment is the Mandela R5 coin. That’s where the bulk of the rip-off is occurring. These guys (the sellers) are doing immeasurable damage to the noble hobby of numismatics,” he told one interviewer.

The Mandela R5s are not only sold by the SA Coin Corporation – they’re available in curio shops targeting the tourist market and on the online marketplace – where prices vary from around R60 to hundreds of thousands. There might occasionally be takers but buyers be warned: off-loading these can spell trouble.

Glenn Schoeman, president of the SA Association of Numismatic Dealers, told me: “A client phoned me and said he had struck a bargain. He had been offered 50 NGC-graded MS66 Nelson Mandelas. The seller only wanted R25 000 apiece. The guy told me they are worth R40 000 each.

“I asked him: ‘How rare can they be? The guy is offering you 50 of them!’”

And buyers are victims, Schoeman insists: “The person who buys Mandela R5s is not a numismatist or a collector, but a victim.”